Past exhibitions: Bridge over chaos (Spring 2016): TORSE DE LA GRANDE OMBRE

Auguste RODIN (1840-1917)Bronze100,5 x 73 x 49 cmCast in 2015 by Susse Fondeur, ParisInscribed A. Rodin, © by Musée Rodin and numbered IV/IV, one of four examples numbered in roman numerals, dated and stamped with foundry markPROVENANCEMusée Rodin, ParisOTHER CASTS IN PUBLIC COLLECTIONSSéoul, Rodin Gallery, 2/8 cast in 1990Shizuoka, Prefectural Museum of Art, acquired in 1992, II/IV cast in 1991São Paulo, State Pinacothèque, acquired in 1995, 3/8, cast in 1991Salvador de Bahia, musée Rodin, acquired in 2002, 6/8LITERATUREAntoinette Le Normand-Romain, The bronzes of Rodin, catalogue of works in the Musée Rodin, vol. II, Paris, 1997, p. 568AUTHENTICATIONA certificate of authenticity, signed by the Director of the Musée Rodin, is given to every purchaser of an original bronze by Auguste RodinThis work will be included in the forthcoming Auguste Rodin catalogue critique de l'oeuvre sculpté currently being prepared by the Comité Auguste Rodin at Galerie Brame et Lorenceau under the direction of Jérôme Le BlayNOTESThe Shade officially appeared when Rodin chose to place at the top of The Gates of Hell three identical figures that were cast from the same mold and assembled on a system of repetitive juxtaposition.  According to Camille Mauclair, these figures represent the recently deceased who stoop in terror as they discover the crowd of damned into which they are about to be thrown.In Dante’s poem (the Divine Comedy is the major source of reference for The Gates of Hell), the Three Shades warn the newly arrived with this terrible sentence: {quote}Lasciate ogni speranza, voi ch'entrate{quote}, most frequently translated as {quote}Abandon all hope, ye who enter here.{quote}A few days after the opening of the 1900 exhibition at the Pavillon de l’Alma, the group, which was first exhibited at the foot of The Gates of Hell, returned to the top of the composition, of which it constitutes the indispensable crowning.The Shade was enlarged in 1901 by Henri Lebossé who took “exceptional” care in his work, as he perceived the figure to be “perhaps the most important piece of sculpture of [Rodin’s] career” (quoted in Antoinette Le Normand-Romain, The Bronzes of Rodin: Catalogue of Works in the Musée Rodin, Paris, 2007, vol. II, p. 570). By isolating a fragment of the figure, Torse de l’Ombre throws a new light on the striking pose of Les Ombres, recalling the venerated ruins of Greek and Roman antiquity. In its contrived, twisted pose, Torse de l’Ombre specifically resonates with the Torse du Belvedère, hinting at Rodin’s challenging relationship with the great tradition of classical sculpture.The Shades gave birth to autonomous sculptures.  Through its movement, the Torso of the Large Shade somehow announces in a metonymical manner the global axis of the sculpture, agitated in a painful contraposto.  Even as it references the antique fragment so dear to Rodin, it is clearly the influence of Michelangelo that is materialized in this subject.
TORSE DE LA GRANDE OMBRE, 1902-1904

 

Auguste RODIN (1840-1917) 

Bronze 

100,5 x 73 x 49 cm 

Cast in 2015 by Susse Fondeur, Paris 

Inscribed A. Rodin, © by Musée Rodin and numbered IV/IV, one of four examples numbered in roman numerals, dated and stamped with foundry mark 

PROVENANCE 

Musée Rodin, Paris 

OTHER CASTS IN PUBLIC COLLECTIONS 

Séoul, Rodin Gallery, 2/8 cast in 1990 

Shizuoka, Prefectural Museum of Art, acquired in 1992, II/IV cast in 1991 

São Paulo, State Pinacothèque, acquired in 1995, 3/8, cast in 1991 

Salvador de Bahia, musée Rodin, acquired in 2002, 6/8 

LITERATURE 

Antoinette Le Normand-Romain, The bronzes of Rodin, catalogue of works in the Musée Rodin, vol. II, Paris, 1997, p. 568 

AUTHENTICATION 

A certificate of authenticity, signed by the Director of the Musée Rodin, is given to every purchaser of an original bronze by Auguste Rodin 

This work will be included in the forthcoming Auguste Rodin catalogue critique de l'oeuvre sculpté currently being prepared by the Comité Auguste Rodin at Galerie Brame et Lorenceau under the direction of Jérôme Le Blay 

NOTES 

The Shade officially appeared when Rodin chose to place at the top of The Gates of Hell three identical figures that were cast from the same mold and assembled on a system of repetitive juxtaposition. According to Camille Mauclair, these figures represent the recently deceased who stoop in terror as they discover the crowd of damned into which they are about to be thrown. 

In Dante’s poem (the Divine Comedy is the major source of reference for The Gates of Hell), the Three Shades warn the newly arrived with this terrible sentence: "Lasciate ogni speranza, voi ch'entrate", most frequently translated as "Abandon all hope, ye who enter here." 

A few days after the opening of the 1900 exhibition at the Pavillon de l’Alma, the group, which was first exhibited at the foot of The Gates of Hell, returned to the top of the composition, of which it constitutes the indispensable crowning. 

The Shade was enlarged in 1901 by Henri Lebossé who took “exceptional” care in his work, as he perceived the figure to be “perhaps the most important piece of sculpture of [Rodin’s] career” (quoted in Antoinette Le Normand-Romain, The Bronzes of Rodin: Catalogue of Works in the Musée Rodin, Paris, 2007, vol. II, p. 570). By isolating a fragment of the figure, Torse de l’Ombre throws a new light on the striking pose of Les Ombres, recalling the venerated ruins of Greek and Roman antiquity. In its contrived, twisted pose, Torse de l’Ombre specifically resonates with the Torse du Belvedère, hinting at Rodin’s challenging relationship with the great tradition of classical sculpture. 

The Shades gave birth to autonomous sculptures. Through its movement, the Torso of the Large Shade somehow announces in a metonymical manner the global axis of the sculpture, agitated in a painful contraposto. Even as it references the antique fragment so dear to Rodin, it is clearly the influence of Michelangelo that is materialized in this subject.